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Thursday, August 10, 2017

Ted Jones - Côco De Londerina - Chantecler 78rpm (1959)

This week, we have Ted Jones, who has the least forró sounding name ever. Ted is performing Côco De Londrina, the b-side to the pleasant, but tame O Justiceiro Do Sertão. While the a-side can be found on the YouTubes, the killer b-side is dusted off for its web debut here. Côco De Londrina shares a similar, lively energy to Luiz Wanderley's tunes from this period.



Ted Jones - Côco De Londerina - Chantecler 78rpm (1959)

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Almirante - Foguinhos (Toada) from A Maior Patente do Rádio - Moto Discos (1986) Victor (1935) & Tudo Em P from Monumento Da MPB - Odeon 78rpm (1938) Fontana (1976)

Much of Almirante's work pre-dates baião, which was first recorded by Luiz Gonzaga in the early 1940s. However, there are elements in earlier recorded Brazilian music that surface in later recordings of forró, samba, bossa nova, Tropicalia and all other musical forms from Brazil. The grooves and melodic beauty are deeply embedded in the culture. Almirante is one of the great Brazilian singer, songwriters and interpreters from the early 20th century. Included here are two ace tracks from separate reissues.

Almirante - Foguinhos (Toada) from A Maior Patente do Rádio - Moto Discos (1986) Victor (1935) 


Almirante - Tudo Em P from Monumento Da MPB - Odeon 78rpm (1938) Fontana (1976) 




Almirante - A Maior Patente do Rádio - Moto Discos (1986) Victor (1935)


Almirante - Monumento Da MPB - Odeon 78rpm (1938) Fontana (1976) 

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Jair Alves - Baião Rock (baião) - RCA (1957)

Back in the 1950s, Brazilians were aware of rock and had their own rock stars. The rhythms also seeped into baião, which was the common name for the genre before forró became ubiquitous. There are several records fused rock and baião, although these were mostly in a novelty capacity. Luiz Wanderley tried rock even dipped his toes into calypso, which was marketed in the US shortly after rock hit big. Baião Rock, by Jair Alves, is more big band than rock, but it is quite interesting and extremely rare. As far as I am aware, this was only issued on 78rpm and is one of Alves's most difficult tracks to find.

Jair Alves - Baião Rock (baião) - RCA (1957)



Jair Alves - Baião Rock (baião) - RCA (1957)

Monday, July 10, 2017

Rossini Pinto - Viver Sem Ninguém from compacto - CBS (1971)

I love hearing slick post-1960s orchestral forró and baião tracks. While string arrangements on baião tunes like this were common in the 1950s from artists like Ivon Curi and Stellinha Egg, the form was limited to mainly traditional instruments by the 1970s. The only styles to gain a little ground were carimbo, funk and disco. Alas, forró in the 70s was pretty much the same as forró today. I am not saying that it is necessarily negative, because many of my favorite recordings come from the early 1970s. However, t was rarely experimental. Gilberto Gil recorded some fairly radical versions of forró around this time. The closest cousin to Viver Sem Ninguém is Forró Em Caruaru by Djalma Pires recorded the same year. Both Pires and Pinto were outsiders in the genre. As far as I can tell, Pinto was marketed as a teen pop star in the 1960s. He never became a cangaceiro suited forró bandit, with the exception of this one unusual record.

Rossini PInto - Viver Sem Ninguém from compacto - CBS (1971)



Rossini PInto - Viver Sem Ninguém from compacto - CBS (1971)

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Lili Melo - Barra Do Dia (côco) from Balance O Lirio - Cantagalo (1967 or 1968)

The album Balance O Lirio was produced by forró legend Pedro Sertanejo. Like Anastácia's records from this period, the album sounds a bit like independent girl groups records from the US in the early 1960s. Barra Do Diá shines through as a standout track. Lili Melo only appeared on a few releases that I know of in her short career. All of these were on Cantagalo, including this LP, Balance O Lirio




Lili Melo - Barra Do Dia (côco) from Balance O Lirio - Cantagalo (1967 or 1968)

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Gordurinha - Chicletes Com Banana from 78rpm & Súplica Cearense LP - Continental (1959) Phonodisc (1987)

Chicletes Com Banana may be THE most famous song by Jackson do Pandeiro. The writing credit lists Almira Castilho, who was Jackson's wife. I do not believe that she was a songwriter, however. Jackson used Castilho as his pen name before they split up. The other writer listed is Gordurinha. His career was short and basically ended around the time of the Brazilian military coup in the early 1960s. Gordurinha's version is far less famous, but equally fantastic. Fortunately, the original 78rpm has been re-released on a number of compilations like the one below. While the LP is not rare, it is scarce outside of Brazil and well worth picking up.



Gordurinha - Súplica Cearense LP - Phonodisc (1987)

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Cajú e Castanha - Pensei Que Não Pensava from Sensação Estranha - Copacabana (1982)

Embolada, or street rap, pre-dates baião and forró as an art form in Brazil. Typically, two performers with pandeiros stake out a spot to busk on the street. They trade humor and good-natured barbs towards each other and the crowd that has gathered around them. Recorded embolada can be acapella (with pandeiros) or with a full band, like Pensei Que Não Pensava. This album has both styles. Cajú e Castanha, who began as street performers when they were children, are one of the most successful duos to cross over into the recording studio. 

This particular LP, and the song featured here, encapsulates EVERYTHING that I hate about vinyl. The quality control at Copacabana for this album clearly wasn't great. They probably overused stampers and didn't check the test pressings. At any rate, I had to buy 3 perfect looking copies of Sensação Estranha before I got one that didn't skip on Pensei Que Não Pensava. Groan. 


Cajú e Castanha - Pensei Que Não Pensava from Sensação Estranha - Copacabana (1982) 


Cajú e Castanha - Sensação Estranha - Copacabana (1982)